The Safe Food Risk Assessment (SFRA) Index

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Risk Question
Low Risk – 3
Medium Risk – 2
High Risk – 1
Produce Safety Review requirement
1.01) Does the farm operator have a produce safety program that is followed to reduce the risk of foodborne illness? to implement and oversee a produce safety program?
A written food safety plan (document) exists and is being implemented.
Produce safety practices are generally followed, but a written document needs to be developed.
A food safety plan is not available.
A written plan or conformance with Cornell bulletin, “Food Safety Begins on the Farm.” www.gaps.cornell.edu or onfarmfoodsafety.org
1.02) Does the farm operator have a person designated to implement and oversee a food safety program?
The designated food safety person is documented in the food safety plan.
Yes, but the written document needs to be developed.
There is no designated produce safety person.
Code of Federal Register (CFR) §112.23
1.03) Has a farm representative completed the Produce Safety Alliance (PSR) or equivalent food safety training?
Yes.
No.
1.04) Are any crop production areas located near or adjacent to dairy, livestock or fowl production commercial livestock, poultry facilities and/ or municipal sewage treatment plant or landfill? And are they in the predominant wind direction of the crop field?
There is no crop production within one mile of a commercial livestock, poultry operation and/or municipal sewage treatment plant or landfill.
A commercial livestock, poultry facility and/or municipal sewage treatment plant or landfill is located within one mile but greater than 100 yards. Or There is a natural barrier that prevents contamination of produce.
There is crop production within one mile. And There is no natural barrier to prevent contamination of produce.
§112.83
2.09) Is there a policy describing procedures regarding produce and food contact surfaces that come into contact with blood and other bodily fluids?
Written policy specifies handling/disposition of fresh produce contaminated with blood or other bodily fluids.
Yes, but a written policy will be developed.
No.
2.10) Are workers instructed to seek prompt treatment for cuts, abrasions and other injuries?
Written policy requires workers to seek treatment for all injuries.
Yes, but the written policy will be developed.
No.
2.11) Are company personnel applying pesticides, sanitizing agents, or other regulated materials certified or licensed?
Records indicate personnel are certified or licensed.
No
Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Administration and MDARD http://www.michigan.gov/ documents/mdard/Final_ Reg_633_Restricted_Use_ Pesticides_547932_7.pdf
2.12) Are company personnel applying non-regulated materials (fertilizers, waxes, cleaners, etc.) trained on their proper use?
Records indicate personnel are trained.
Yes, but no records.
No.
3.01) Is production water quality adequate for the crop being irrigated?
municipal system. Annual water test by local water authority is documented. Or, Irrigation water provided by an on-farm well that is tested annually and the results are documented. Or, Irrigation water provided by surface water that is tested three times a year and the results are documented.
Surface water sources are tested once near harvest time. (Note: Water testing is especially important if water comes in direct contact with edible parts of the plant and the food is eaten raw.)
Water is provided from a source that is not tested.
Water test reports indicate water is safe for irrigation. §112.44(b) Production water can be Irrigation, dust abatement, frost protection, hand washing, etc.
3.02) Is water for chemical and fertilizer application adequate for the crop being treated?
Water provided by municipal system. Annual water test by local water authority is documented. Or, Water provided by an on- farm well that is tested annually and the results are documented. Or, Water provided by surface water that is tested three times a year and the results are documented.
Surface water sources are tested once near harvest time.
Water is provided from a source that is not tested.
Water test reports indicate water is safe for chemical and fertilizer application.
3.03) Is production water inspected annually and protected from potential direct and non-point sources of contamination?
Water source is contaminated.
§112.42 (a) Production water can be Irrigation, dust abatement, frost protection, hand washing, etc.
4.01) Are measures taken to restrict access of livestock (domestic and wild) to the source or delivery system of crop irrigation water and crop production areas?
Every effort is made to restrict livestock access, including noise cannons, scare balloons, fencing and other barriers.
Some effort is made to limit animal access to irrigation water.
No effort made to limit animal access.
§112.41 and §112.42
4.02) Are crop production areas monitored for the presence or signs of wild or domestic animals entering the land?
Records indicate production areas are monitored for the presence of animals.
Yes, but records will be developed.
Production areas are not monitored for the presence of animals, where potential exists.
§112.83
5.01) If raw manure or other animal byproducts are used for crop production, is it applied in a manner that does not contact covered produce during application and minimizes potential for contact with covered produce after application?
Manure application records document manure is incorporated and applied 270 or more days prior to harvest and does not touch any part of the harvestable product.
Manure application records document manure is applied and incorporated 120 or more days prior to harvest and does not touch any part of the harvestable product.
Manure use records indicate proper food- safety use practices. USDA GAP >120 days §112.56
5.02) Are liquid manure storage ponds located near or adjacent to crop production areas contained to prevent contamination of crops?
Storage ponds are properly constructed and maintained to prevent leakage and overflow.
Storage ponds are not properly constructed and maintained to prevent leakage and overflow.
§112.52(a)
5.03) Is manure, compost, or biosolids stored either in the field or on farm near production areas contained to prevent contamination of crops?
No manure, compost, or biosolids are leaching or running off from manure storage area.
Any potential manure, compost or biosolids leaching and/or runoff is contained.
Manure, compost or biosolids can leach and/or run off into crop production areas and is not contained.
Proper manure storage demonstrated or indicated in records.
5.04) If composted manure, dead animals and/or treated biosolids are used, is the material properly treated to reduce the level of pathogens?
Document in food safety plan indicates materials have been treated to reduce the level of pathogens or if received from a third party a certificate has been provided.
Treatment of the materials is not documented.
Compost/biosolid use records indicate proper food-safety use practices. Once the compost has been documented as treated no other amendments can be added. §112.54 §112.55
6.01) Have production fields been assessed for previous land uses that may pose contamination risks?
Yes. Records indicate there are no potential risks from previous land uses (dairy, livestock or poultry feedlot and/or improper use of animal wastes, farm dump or other potentially contaminating uses).
Fields are assessed, but records need to be developed.
No assessment of previous land use has been conducted.
6.02) When previous land uses indicate possibility of contamination, have preventative measures been taken?
Records indicate crops with minimal contact with the soil, or non-food crops are grown.
Crops with minimal contact with the soil, or non-food crops are grown, but records need to be developed.
No preventative measures taken to prevent food contamination.
6.03) Are fields that are subject to periodic flooding avoided to prevent crop contamination?
Yes.
Fields subject to flooding are used for non-food crops, portions of food crops that experience flooding are not harvested, or other precautionary measures are taken.
No.
7.01) Are production fields assessed before harvest for possible sources of contamination?
The food safety plan documents a pre-harvest assessment.
A pre-harvest assessment is done, but a written document needs to be developed.
No pre-harvest assessment is done.
7.02) Are the number, condition and placement of toilet and hand washing units in compliance with state and federal regulations?
At least one toilet and one hand-washing facility for each 20 or fraction of workers.
OSHA regulations are not met.
Convenient field sanitation unit(s) confirmed . OSHA
7.03) Are field sanitation units located in a place that to minimizes the risk for product contamination in the case of tipping, leaking or malfunction?
Field sanitation units are properly located to prevent or minimize risk of contamination to crop fields.
A spill or leak from a field sanitation unit may run into production area or product storage area.
Note: This question is N.A. if farm does not use. a field sanitation unit(s). §112.129(b)(1)
7.04) Are field sanitation units located in an accessible place for servicing?
Location is accessible.
Location is inaccessible.
Note: This question is N.A. if farm does not use a field sanitation unit(s).
7.05) Does the farm operator have a response plan in the case of a spill or leak of a field sanitation unit?
A clean-up policy is in the food safety plan. A spill response kit is ready and accessible to everyone on the farm.
A clean-up policy is in the food safety plan.
No.
Note: This question is N.A. if farm does not use a field sanitation unit(s).
7.06) Are sewage and septic systems monitored and maintained?
Facilities are periodically monitored and maintained in accordance with state and local laws.
No.
§112.131 (a)(b)© §112.133 (a)(b)(c)(d)
8.01) Are harvesting containers that come in direct contact with produce cleaned and sanitized as appropriate and necessary?
The food safety plan documents that containers are cleaned and sanitized as appropriate and necessary.
Containers are kept cleaned and sanitized as appropriate and necessarybut a written document will be developed.
Containers are not kept cleaned.
Clean harvest containers confirmed. §112.123 (d)
8.02) Is transportation equipment that comes in direct contact with produce cleaned and sanitized as necessary?
The food safety plan documents that vehicles are kept as clean as practicable.
Vehicles are kept clean, but a written document will be developed.
Harvesting vehicles are not kept clean.
Clean harvest vehicles confirmed. §112.125 (a) & (b)
8.03) Are hand-harvesting implements (knives, pruners, machetes, etc,) kept clean on a scheduled basis?
The food safety plan documents cleaning and sanitizing schedule for harvesting equipment.
Harvesting implements are cleaned and sanitized, but a written document will be developed.
Harvesting implements are not cleaned and sanitized.
Clean harvest implements confirmed. §112.123 (d) (1)
8.04) Are damaged containers properly repaired or disposed of?
Containers are inspected for damage on a regular basis. Damage containers are repaired or discarded.
Damaged containers are used in harvest operations.
§112.22 (b)
8.05) Is harvest equipment and/or machinery in good repair?
Yes.
Leaking fluids and/or damaged parts may contaminate produce.
8.06) Are light bulbs and other glass protected so as not to contaminate produce?
All exposed glass fixtures on harvesting equipment are protected with a wire cover, enclosed fixture or other means.
Some glass fixtures are not protected.
8.07) Is there a written policy in the case of product contamination by chemicals, petroleum, pesticides or other contaminating factor?
Written policy is available to deal with product contamination.
Written policy will be developed.
Contaminating factors may end up in harvested produce.
8.08) Is there a written policy in the case of broken glass or plastic during the harvesting operations?
Written policy is available to deal with product contamination.
Written policy will be developed.
Broken glass or plastic may end up in harvested produce.
8.09) For mechanically harvested crops, are measures taken to inspect for and remove foreign objects (glass, metal, rocks or other dangerous/toxic items)?
Harvested produce is inspected and cleaned of foreign objects.
Foreign objects may end up in harvested produce.
8.10) Are containers, currently being used for harvest, also used for carrying or storing non- produce items?
No. Written policy in the food safety plan does not allow harvest containers to be used for non-produce items.
Harvest containers used to carry or store non- produce items and are clearly labeled.
Harvest containers used to carry or store non- produce items and are not labeled.
§112.116
8.11) Is water applied to harvested products microbially safe showing no detectable generic E. coli?
Records indicate water is microbially safe for the harvested products showing no detectable generic E. coli.
Water used on harvested product is not tested, but considered safe.
Water used on harvested product is not microbially safe.
Water test reports indicate water is safe. §112.44 (a)(4)
8.12) Is produce, especially high risk such as leafy greens, washed and stored after harvest in a way that minimizes potential contamination?
Yes. No water is used after harvest or a sanitizer is used and monitored frequently. Temperature is also monitored.
A sanitizer is used, wash water is changed frequently, and/or only running water is used. Temperature is not monitored.
No
§112.113
8.13) Are efforts taken to remove excess dirt and mud from produce during harvest?
Every effort is taken to keep the produce as clean as possible.
Dirt and mud contaminate harvested produce.
§112.113
8.14) How is dropped produce handled prior to harvest?
No dropped produce is collected. Or Dropped produce collected from the ground is not sold for raw consumption.
Produce is picked up from the ground and sold for raw consumption.
§112.114
8.15) Is harvested produce covered during transportation from the field?
Farm policy in the food safety plan requires produce to be covered with tarp, enclosed trailer or truck or other means.
Produce is covered, but a written policy needs to be developed.
Produce is not covered and is exposed to other vehicles, overhead contamination, birds, dust and other
9.01) Are only new or sanitized containers used for packing produce?
Food Safety Plan documents that only new or sanitized consumer containers are used.
Some new containers are used. Mostly clean, used consumer containers are used. Containers are not sanitized.
Some dirty, not sanitized containers are used.
New, sanitized or clean consumer containers confirmed. §112.116
9.02) Are produce containers and other packing materials properly stored and protected from contamination?
Produce containers and other packing materials are properly stored and protected from contamination.
There is a potential risk that containers and packing materials may become contaminated in storage area.
Containers and packing materials are or are likely to become contaminated in storage area.
Proper storage of containers and packi. §112.123 (b)(2) §112.116 (b)
9.03) Are food contact surfaces in packing area and equipment (including refrigeration units) in good condition, clean and sanitized on a regular basis?
Food Safety Plan documents that food contact surfaces and areas are clean and sanitized on a regular basis.
Food contact surfaces and areas are clean and sanitized on a regular basis. A written document needs to be developed.
Dirty food contact surfaces or packing area may contaminate produce.
Clean food contact surfaces and packing area observed. §112.123 (c) & (d)(1)
10.01) Is the produce container or the product itself uniquely identified to allow trace back to the farm where it was produced?
Yes. Traceability is documented.
No
Produce uniquely identified to allow traceability
10.02) If the farm is qualified exempt are you keeping proper records and providing complete business information on labels and/or signs? Pesticides and Crop Protection Materials (not assessed by USDA GAP audit)
Yes. Records are kept and all labels and/or signs provide the complete name and business address of the farm where the produce is grown.
No.
§112.6 (b)
11.01) Is there a written crop protection material mixing and loading policy to protect food safety?
A written policy in the food safety plan specifies mixing and loading requirements.
Safe mixing and loading procedures are followed, but a written statement needs to be developed.
Risky mixing and loading practices are occurring on the farm.
11.02) Is crop protection material mixing and loading adequately isolated from water sources and production fields?
--At least 200 ft from surface waters -At least 150 feet from private wells -At least 800 feet from public wells unless protective site features exist.* -Adequate isolation to prevent contamination of production fields
Isolation does not meet the minimum low-risk requirements.
*Note: See MAEAP Technician for additional information on reduced isolation requirement from public wells.
11.03) Are crop protection materials registered for use on the crops that are treated (the product label lists the crop as eligible for application)?
Products are registered for use with the Environmental Protection Agency and with the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.
Products are not registered for use.
11.04) Do crop protection material applicators read and follow the label instructions?
Everyone using crop protection materials follows label and labeling instructions.
Label and labeling instructions are not always followed.
11.05) Are pre-harvest interval requirements (days to harvest) followed?
No produce is harvested after the last crop protection application until the minimum days have passed.
Harvest may occur before the pre-harvest interval is met.
11.06) Are the applicators of restricted-use pesticides (RUP) certified applicators?
The applicators of RUP comply with the certification requirements.
Non-certified and unsupervised applicators use RUP.
11.07) How do you assure that pesticide applications remain on- target and minimize off-target pesticide spray drift?
A written drift management plan is utilized that minimizes off-target drift.
Spraying operations are completed regardless of weather conditions or forecast, and regardless of the potential for off-target drift.
11.08) What pesticide application records are kept?
Accurate records are maintained of all application of pesticides for at least three years (one year for general use pesticides).
Partial records are kept.
No record is kept. Chemicals used are known by memory or invoices only.
Adequate pesticide records confirmed or plans to maintain complete application records
11.09) How are excess mixtures and pesticide tank rinsate disposal handled?
Excess mixtures or rinsate are used at or below label rates.
There is no plan in place to deal with excess mixture or rinsate.
11.10) Are crop protection materials and harvested products transported in the same vehicle storage area?
Never.
Yes, but after a thorough cleaning of the storage area.
Yes, without cleaning the storage area. Produce may become contaminated.
12.01) Is there an immediate food safety risk where produce is grown, processed, packed or stored?
No. There is no evidence of conditions or processes that have/or can contaminate products.
Yes. There is evidence of conditions or processes that have/or can contaminate products.
Satisfactory farm review. Any immediate food safety risk will result in an automatic unsatisfactory farm review under USDA GAP audit: Examples include excessive rodents, insects or other pests; employee practices that jeopardize the safety of produce; evidence of falsification of any food safety records and other unsatisfactory conditions and processes